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«Cézanne Site / Non-Site», exhibition at the Thyssen Museum

«Cézanne Site / Non-Site», exhibition at the Thyssen Museum

From February 4 to May 18, the Thyssen-Bornesmiza Museum will exhibit an impressive collection of Impressionist works around the figure of Cézanne. Directed by curator Gillermo Solana, "Cézanne Site / Non-Site" will show the public a total of 49 oils and 9 watercolors by the French Impressionist, accompanied by 9 other works by contemporary artists such as Pissarro, Gaugain, Bernard, Derain, etc.

The Flood Myth and a Prototype of a Round Ark on a Babylonian Tablet from 1725 BC

The Flood Myth and a Prototype of a Round Ark on a Babylonian Tablet from 1725 BC

The myth of the universal Flood and Noah's Ark narrated in the book of Genesis has become fashionable this year due to the premiere of the film starring Russel Crowe that tells the story with the characteristic paraphernalia of Hollywood cinema. According to the biblical story, God launched a flood to punish human beings for losing their customs and values ​​and moving away from the divine path, and only Noah, his family and a couple of each animal species could be saved in an ark that he built to survive the Deluge.

Cardinal Mazarin's lost chest was used as a bar counter

Cardinal Mazarin's lost chest was used as a bar counter

During the first years of the seventeenth century, the Tokugawa shogunate government stimulated foreign trade, increasing its fortune enormously between 1603 and 1635. But it was from this last year that the shogunate took a complete turn and by introducing of the Detention laws only some foreign ships (Chinese, Korean and Dutch) were allowed to enter Japanese territory.

Diet and travel in the ancient Sahara through human bones

Diet and travel in the ancient Sahara through human bones

Knowing the remote past, Antiquity, undoubtedly requires mixing disciplines such as anthropology, paleontology, biology and the history of art. Ceramics, material remains or burials, among others, serve to trace the traces of ancient civilizations, but the bodies that have come down to us over time are also important.

They find evidence of the earthquake that hit Hippos-Sussita

They find evidence of the earthquake that hit Hippos-Sussita

A large team of archaeologists and specialists from the University of Haifa (Israel) have recently found important evidence that attests to the earthquake that occurred in 363 in the city of Hippos-Sussita, just three kilometers east of the Sea of ​​Galilee, also known as Kineret Lake.

Sexuality in Ancient Rome

Sexuality in Ancient Rome

Ancient Rome had a different concept of sexuality, depending on the class, social status and sex of the individual. There was no distinction between homosexuality and heterosexuality as the sexual nature of an individual. In Roman society the male had more authority due to his "active" masculinity, symbol of power and status.